ヒカルの碁 1 (ジャンプコミックスDIGITAL)。 ヒカルの碁 9 (ジャンプコミックスDIGITAL) by Yumi Hotta

Hikaru finds out, and arranges a game with Sai, who has been begging for a chance to play the Meijin again since they first met. The second half of the tankobon has Shindo tricked Atsushi Kurata into playing Go with him by appealing to his vanity. However, perhaps that's why I was so sad when. Now that I'm re-reading this series, this volume offers more foreshadowing of Sai's final fate. He wants to win and impress others with his own skill, without Sai. And the filler at the end with Waya and his little friend was pure fluff. This is a catch-up volume where we get to see how these two have changed over the pro test arcs, now that Hikaru can take a step back and check in with Sai instead of constantly worrying about hi This is a crucial volume in the development of Hikaru and Sai as a duo. With this new development of Ko Yongha insulting Honinbo Shusaku provides new tension to the newly formed Japanese Team. It is a tension filled game against two geniuses and only one could come out the winner — Fujiwara-no-Sai. We also see a neat bit of storytelling in which Akira and Hikaru each end up playing four simultaneous games and the same astounding result. Keep it straight in your head? I wasn't sure how I'd do, jumping into the middle of this series after a 10-year break, but I got swept up by Sai and the Meijin's match pretty quickly. which leads to an outcome no one could have seen coming. Suyong, it turns out, has been having mental blocks to overcome much like Hikaru, and their game is both boys' current situation in life in black and white. So apparently Hotta has decided to set up a big international tournament as the storyline that will occupy the rest of the series. Yashiro, Hikaru, and Akira stay at Akira's currently empty home for a while, playing nonstop practice matches against each other until they drop. Some nice character work here. This volume is all about the long-awaited game between Sai and Toya Koyo! Then he keeps a promise to Hikaru to play against Sai online, even though he believes that Sai's decision to only play online is cowardly he has no idea Sai is a ghost. All in all, an interesting tankobon, I'm glad that they continued with the story. Even if they didn't play a game in a competition, they learn a lot from each-other and develop this healthy rivalry. and that Akira is already p Hikaru plays against other Shodan, even though he's far stronger than they are, and we're repeatedly reminded that everyone has to start at this point and work their way up. Hikaru isn't just an observer to this game, he's someone who's finally beginning to understand that level of play- and as this series continues there's sure to be a big change in how This volume is all about the long-awaited game between Sai and Toya Koyo! One reporter shows up on what may be the wrong day, to interview the Korean team, and the answers he receives, through an emergency substitute translator, seem like a deliberate insult to Japanese Go. This catches the attention of Akira, who is by now really obsessed with Hikaru. " The game shifts back and forth, and if accepted as being A solid continuation--13 saw Shindo arrange for an internet Go game between Sai and Toya Meijin, and this volume has the game actually play out. I found so far what I have read to be very entertaining. All in all, the tankobon was really good. There's a definite change in both players, as well as Hikaru, and the rest of the professional go world. It hurt my heart that Akira's dad was working towards a rematch that he didn't know could never happen. This could be the very climax of the entire series itself, there's so much riding on it. With Hikaru now re-committed to Go and actually taking his pro-games seriously a new set of challenges arises. It will be very interesting to see how their relationship evolves. In fact, that particular Go Salon practically adopted him as their mascot and let him play for free. With Toya teaming up with Ochi the rest of the Pro Exam promises to be just as intense! This leads to extra stress on Hikaru and the others. Afterwards, Hikaru is just finding new challenges, in a 6 dan player named Kurata. It almost felt that this was happening too soon, this series still had legs at this point, and it's almost a pity that this wasn't place nearer this series conclusion. As it becomes increasingly important for Hikaru to "fight his own battles," Sai is pushed further and further from the board and more and more into an advisory role. The most entertaining moments for me weren't the games, but the fact that Hikaru and Akira start meeting at the Go salon to discuss games, especially their own, and the arguments they get into are a nice touch. In volume 12, she has Hikaru playing in the "Shinsodan" series, which pits rookie go professionals against the top veterans. Although this was really only an average installment, I'm being generous and giving volume 19 four stars because it's nice to see the story move forward again. Hon Suyon will return as a representative of the South Korea Team and Zhao Shi would return as a representative for the China Team with Yang Hai will serve as Team Leader. 75~104局) This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. Shindo would frequent the Meijin's Go Salon to play a game with Toya and would eventually argue. Burn but also so beautiful Jesus Christ I'm about to cry again.... So let's give him something else to fight for, some other personal reason to fight! Totally more exciting than it sounds! Also, Shindo plays Kanata-san in a "friendly" match--i. On the very day of the game, Shindo agreed to let Sai play the Meijin, but at a severe handicap, which Sai agreed to. In which, Shindo and Sai devoured. Sai insists that Hikaru should pay him a visit - there, he finds out that Koyo Toya plays go over the Internet, so he challenges him in behalf of Sai. This was another solid volume. There is a minor overlap from the Anime's conclusion to the continuation of the Manga series, yet the story flows according to what has been previously introduced. That took a star off for me, as the pervasive feeling that would be the case kept me from enjoying things as much as I'd have liked to. My take on this reread, is that the secret to this serie's greatness is whenever Sai shows up. Sai was nowhere to be found, having left the main cast several volumes ago. Everyone was watching, and the ripples are starting to show. Afterwards, Hikaru goes to a Go exhibit, where he discovers a fraud and lets Sai beat a pro as punishment. They show up at one salon and find out most of the patrons are foreigners from Korea. Also, Shindo plays Kanata-san in a "friendly" match--i. Meh, pretty much a "filler" volume as the players gear up for the Japan-Korea-China Junior Tournament. This ongoing manga about the game of Go is generally fascinating. With their help, they provided Shindo with old copies of Go Weekly — a newspaper dedicated to the Go World. It's rewarding to see Hikaru being a proper pro, actually playing his games and having the respect of others for his play not just his potential or reputation. Apparently, Hikaru Shindo saw a move — a move that Sai or the Meijin didn't think of or seen — a move if the Meijin had taken would have secured his victory. The last week's chapter I think is set at the beginning of the first round of the Pro-Test proper, but I don't believe the game even quite gets started. Yashiro, Hikaru, and Akira stay at Akira's currently empty home for a while, pla Ochi beats Waya, qualifying for the Hokuto Cup, but when he sees Hikaru and Yashiro's game, he knows it's several levels above his and Waya's. Hikaru's Insei friends are taking him to go salons to play against grown-ups, which is improving his game a lot. Toya Koyo ViZ, 1998 Hotta once again makes the playing of a go match into a nail-biting experience as Sai and Toya finally face off. I really feel for Sai and the anime actually adds a bit that's not in the book to give it a slightly more upbeat feel. This looks like a turning point for both characters -- the only question is, will Hotta In the last volume of this series, I felt Sai's confusion was mirroring author Yumi Hotta's confusion about where the storyline was going. A lot of it is thanks to the characters and to the different situations they find themselves in. The Go match between Hikaru and the Korean Insei was such a good build-up of character. Akira is seeded in the team, but the rest of the spots are under doubt. The day after, Shindo visits the Meijin wanting to The first half of the tankobon deals with the continuing online game of Koyo Toya and Sai and the world observing the game. Hotta's storyline regains its forward momentum as Hikaru and his friends learn of and begin preparing for the Japan-China-Korea Junior Team Tournament. This was still fun and a good read, but quite mediocre for the series, and it wouldn't have made me a fan if it was my first volume. 116 had me balling my eyes out. It's a nice bit of character drama which Hotta resolves with yet another bit of go trickery. Somehow, this volume feels like still covering the essentials. Ending at volume 17 was the poetic thing to do from a story standpoint, but volume 17 onwards was a lot more realistic. There's a come-back of the crook 7dan player who is defeated by Hikaru. later to find out my school had a club for it. Looking back, this was Hikaru no Go at its peak and it won't probably approach this height ever again. Sai had an origin story and an archnemesis who hasn't been mentioned since maybe volume one or two. Shindo would eventually win six games in a row, which got Akira Touya interested as he ponders how strong Shindo has become. And in the story it doesn't feel as monotonous as it may sound. In fact, they're almost more exciting than the game itself, although I have to say that I find most of the games truly captivating, especially because sometimes you don't know who you want to win. Now that Hikaru is a pro and a strong player in his own right, his dependence on Sai is diminishing, while Sai's desire to play the stronger players Hikaru is facing grows. I think if I had read the manga from the start, I wouldn't have been nearly so shocked when , maybe. , a stunt to make an excuse for an otherwise unimportant game to take up so much page space. " Hikaru accidentally gets into a scuffle with a 12-year-old Korean boy named Suyong Hong. I find the artwork to be more interesting in the later volumes, as Obata is now drawing "older" characters, and the surroundings include more adults, thus less of the cloying cuteness that mars many Manga series I prefer the more realistic Manga - NOT the "cute" stuff. If it hadn't been [for his pride, he'd have gone to the Hokuto Cup. I love the art--you can actually see Hikaru and his age-mates maturing during the series--and I love the story. The match that would go down in history as the best game ever! Finally, the game Sai waited for ever since he seen Toya Meijin on the Tv screen! Apparently, the game with Sai changed the Meijin, although he lost his Judan title to Ogata prior to his retirement, his game seem rejuvenated and young again. Desptie his loss, Kurata became wary of Shindo too and relayed as much to Akira Toya when he visited his father. In his free time, Hikaru analyzes his and Akira's games with Akira. Found myself ripping through this one. So I wonder if Yumi Hotta is going to do something with the nominal "supernatural" element of this series. However, we are treated to a far better match — one that I wasn't even anticipating! Hikaru, the central character, has just qualified for an important tournament that will pit young players from Japan against their peers from This ongoing manga about the game of Go is generally fascinating. Well, obviously the series is building up to the big confrontation between Hikaru and Akira Toya, but as with so many of the games in this series, we see intermediate proxy fights in which Hotta has to come up with a new twist. I'm about halfway through the series now. It's good that they followed up with Kadowaki's story though. And Akira's father, Toya Meijin, requests Hikaru as his opp Now that Hikaru is a professional go player at age 14 where is the story going to go? That said, some of these chapters are a little meandering. When Sai finds out who it is, he begs to be all Yumi Hotta, Hikaru no Go, vol. Fujiwara no Sai now senses that his entire purpose in being a ghost for a thousand years was to lead Hikaru to "the divine move. All in all, it was a wonderful tankobon, I wished that Toya and Shindo would have their all-fated match, but looking ahead, there are ten more tankobon, so they have plenty of time. Then I remembered that the 18th volume is just some short stories that don't necessarily add to the story itself, sooo..... Come on, admit it, THIS is the match you've been waiting to see the whole series. I'm really loving this, but I guess that's obvious :D Yumi Hotta, Hikaru no Go, vol. Not much happens - just preparations for the Hokuto Cup. Takeshi Obata's artwork fits the series and is excellent throughout. However, allowing Sai to play through him would complicate Shindo's life. What Shindo didn't know, what he would find out, was that his very first professional game was with drum rolls Akira Toya! Another excellent entry in the series. There is a minor overlap from the Anime's conclusion to the continuation of the Manga series, yet the story flows according to what has been previously introduced. That reporter character was truly a n Although the final arc of this series would be an international go tournament, I couldn't help feel as a long time reader that this series was limping to the finish. This volume takes place nearly entirely between the rounds of the Pro-Test. We're finally going to see it- Sai facing off against Toya Meijin! Hon Suyon will return as a representative of the South Korea Team and Zhao Shi would return as a representative for the China Team with Yang Hai will serve as Team Leader. Oh, poor Akari, who obviously has a crush on Hikaru despite the fact that so far he's shown about as much romantic inclination as a go stone. This is a crucial volume in the development of Hikaru and Sai as a duo. One of the most interesting things in this volume is how the Korean characters are depicted, which is more "Asian-looking" than the Insei they're playing against. Is Hotta ever going to go anywhere with this hint of a subplot? A new status quo of Akira and Hikaru as frenemy rivals, HIkaru taking pro games seriously and earning wins, and everyone getting read to prove their strength with the possiblity of competing in an international tournament. Then I remembered that the 18th volume is just some short stories that don't necessarily add to the story itself, sooo..... Furthermore, he knows quite a bit of the Go World and would occasionally help him out. My take on this reread, is that the secret to this serie's greatness is whenever Sai shows up. It's like a training arc while preparing for the Hokuto Cup, but without any real training. As we enter the final stretch we're getting into the mind of Hikaru and why he wants to win so bad- yes, he's fueled by the determination to beat Akira Toya and be better at the game, but why should he care about the Hokuto Cup? Disappointed, Shindo asked the Meijin to play seriously, because he shouldn't have that excuse when he lost to Sai. Everything was headed for this titanic match up. I don't often get goosebumps from reading but did multiple times down the stretch of this volume. " Hikaru to Akira and the people at Akira's Go salon I still wonder about Sai. In fact, that particular Go Salon practically adopted him as their mascot and let him play for free. Akira is now playing against higher ranked players, and Hikaru wishes he could too. I find the artwork to be more interesting in the later volumes, as Obata is now drawing "older" characters, and the surroundings include more adults, thus less of the cloying cuteness that mars many Manga series I prefer the more realistic M This volume isn't as interesting as the previous one. She may not understand Go in the slightest, but she does her best to make sure he has the time to concentrate on it. Shindo's very first game as a Pro is his Shinshodan Series against Toya Meijin, who Sai wanted to play with a vengeance. A new status quo of Akira and Hikaru as frenemy rivals, HIkaru taking pro games seriously and earning wins, and everyone getting read to prove their strength with the possiblity of competing in an international tournament. Thanks to an inadequate translator, Hikaru hears that Ko Yong Ha insulted Honin'bo Shusaku the Meh, pretty much a "filler" volume as the players gear up for the Japan-Korea-China Junior Tournament. Hotta gears up again after the set of supporting character short-tales in the last volume. So let's give him something else to fight for, some other personal reason to fight! About mid-way through the tankobon, Shindo nearly caused a minor International Incident — after a fashion. It was a stretch to think that a faulty translation would even amount to such malicious intent. In which, Shindo and Sai devoured. Hikaru Shindo, 1- The tankobon opens with Hikaru Shindo's Pro Ceremony, where despite reaching equal status within the Go World, Akira Toya refuses to acknowledge Shindo's presence, which enrages Shindo to no end. 13: First Professional Match ViZ, 1998 If you're at all surprised by the identity of the character Hikaru is slated to play in his first professional match, more power to you. For those not familiar with the game, those are the "big three" nations of the game, and so the matches gain the attention of the press. Toya Meijin game was satisfying, with a few little twists thrown in, but the results seem mostly intended to remove a character as an active complication in the series. The build up that took over 2 year to set up, the best match of this series: The Meijin versus Sai! Hikaru finally learns about the Japan-China-Korea Junior Cup... He starts with a winning streak of six games. The overall rank of the series I'd put at about 4 or 4. Isumi was given directions to a very strong Go Salon after one of their training sessions. I love the growth during the one-month summer vacations!! I love all the main characters, and I love the idea of the chase and how Akira and Hikaru's actions are always connected. The most interesting moment for me comes when Shindo has a startling moment of growth in the wake of that internet game. It will be very interesting to see how their relationship evolves. Overall so fa So I am reviewing this for a number of volumes up to like 19. I love how the authors' convey Hikaru's desire to get stronger so Akira will notice him. He doesn't really care about that. Anyway, I liked volume 9, The Pro Test Begins, because it's really showing how Hikaru is progressing, and also brings in some new conflicts. Their banter is actually the cutest thing in the world. Sooner or later Hikaru and Akira have to have their ultimate showdown, and Sai has to play a "real" game against Toya Meijin. About as well plotted, paced, and illustrated example of manga you're going to find. Another character that I've grown to like is Kawai, a halfhearted taxi driver that spends most of his time playing Go and is a big supporter of Shindo. Nice setup for the follow-up to the main story - there is a new tournament between China, Korea and Japan under 18 - and there will be a tournament to decide who will join the team. As we enter the final stretch we're getting into the mind of Hikaru and why he wants to win so bad- yes, he's fueled by the determination to beat Akira Toya and be better at the game, but why should he care about the Hokuto Cup? The tankobon opens with Hikaru Shindo's Pro Ceremony, where despite reaching equal status within the Go World, Akira Toya refuses to acknowledge Shindo's presence, which enrages Shindo to no end. There really wasn't a lot else to this installment; it's just a prelude to the climax of the series. First off I started reading this series because I was bored at the time. Currently reading: I accidentally got the wrong book from my library, so I was like dang I can't read yet? I love how the authors' convey Hikaru's desire to get stronger so Akira will notice him. Come on, admit it, THIS is the match you've been waiting to see the whole series. Hikaru finally learns about the Japan-China-Korea Junior Cup... That said, some of these chapters are a little meandering. He likes to playfully yell at Shindo or give him noogies or put him in a headlock. At this point it's hard to know whether to feel more sorry for him, who is stuck haunting a 14-year-old, or Hikaru, who now wants to play for his own development but has a ghost begging him to let him play. He's basically an all around great guy. At first the Meijin was reluctant to play Sai, because he preferred to paly people face-to-face, but for Shindo sake, he would play Sai via the Internet, but mentioned that it would be a nice diversion between title matches while he was stuck at hospital. After this experience, he is no longer intimidated by Tsubaki and his antics, and he finally manages to be calm and collected when playing even against this kind of people. You'd have no equal, no rival. Unfortunately for him, Yashiro wins and becomes part of Japan's Hokuto Cup team. Some nice character work here. It was a stretch to think that a faulty translation would even amount to such malicious intent. While there he noticed that the Meijin was playing Go online. I look forward to reading the next tankobon to find the winner of the match. When Sai finds out who it is, he begs to be allowed to play the match himself, but Hikaru is concerned that his play is now different enough from Sai's that people will notice. it must be lonely to be the God of Go. However, perhaps that's why I was so sad when. I mean, are you really going to do this until the last volume, Hotta? Some really good stuff here, can't wait to see where Hotta takes it. This was the state of the online Go world when "sai" came out of retirement and challenges the Meijin to an online game — the online Go world goes crazy. Whether it being the mystery of Sai in Hikaru or Sai vs Touya's father. Now that I'm re-reading this series, this volume offers more foreshadowing of Sai's final fate. And I am knocking a whole star off for the heavy-handed plot device of having Akira's father, Toyo Meijin, have a heart attack just before the game. After some negotiating, Meijin agrees. Toya's aloofness was not without reason. Shindo didn't make a great impression to the older pro, but their interaction was quite humorous. So, Shindo was led to believe that Ko Yongha has insulted Shusaku and the only way to redeem Sai's name was to beat him in a match using Sai's Go. I also love how some of his fellow students - Waya and Isumi - help him even though they are technically rivals. " Although even the filler is readable enough so far. I don't often get goosebumps from reading but did multiple times down the stretch of this volume. Which is good and all, but I'm excited for the actual tournament to start instead of watching them hmm and haww over what will happen during it. The politician is a VIP and Akira finds out he is expected to lose.。

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